Chocolatey Namesakes

As Homer Truffle Co creates, one question is always ringing in our ears: What sets our chocolate apart? Really? The only way we have been able to answer that question is by taking the reactions and responses given after people try our chocolate and continue to strive for those reactions and responses.  

One of the obvious characteristics of our chocolate is that it is made in Alaska. Our chocolates reflect this with ingredients, aesthetics, and their names. Our current truffle collection is our staple product. They will be available year round, even when seasonal truffles and chocolate products are available. We wanted to share with our non-Alaskan readers and followers what the truffle names mean. Some are obvious while others are an attempt at introducing some lightheartedness.

  Black Bear  - Our intensely completely dark chocolate truffle was named after one of the three species of bear found in Alaska. According to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game ( ADFG  - Click here for pictures and more information), there are approximately 100,000 black bears living in our great state. An interesting fact about the black bear is that their fur can actually range in color from black to white to brown and even blue!

Black Bear - Our intensely completely dark chocolate truffle was named after one of the three species of bear found in Alaska. According to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADFG - Click here for pictures and more information), there are approximately 100,000 black bears living in our great state. An interesting fact about the black bear is that their fur can actually range in color from black to white to brown and even blue!

  Brown Bear  - A truffle milk chocolate center dipped in milk chocolate and covered in milk chocolate curls can only and rightfully be called brown bear. The brown bear is a second of three species of bear that live in Alaska. They can be differentiated from black bear by their size, physical features, and length of claws rather than their color. Brown bears have subspecies of which one is the grizzly. If you’d like to see a unique species of brown bear that has had no interaction with other species of bear for over 12,000 years, visit the Kodiak Archipelago! ( ADFG  - Click here for pictures and more information)

Brown Bear - A truffle milk chocolate center dipped in milk chocolate and covered in milk chocolate curls can only and rightfully be called brown bear. The brown bear is a second of three species of bear that live in Alaska. They can be differentiated from black bear by their size, physical features, and length of claws rather than their color. Brown bears have subspecies of which one is the grizzly. If you’d like to see a unique species of brown bear that has had no interaction with other species of bear for over 12,000 years, visit the Kodiak Archipelago! (ADFG - Click here for pictures and more information)

  Mountain Avens  - Our pleasantly light lemon truffle’s namesake is a whimsical yet hardy little white or yellow flower that thrives in the arctic tundra, sometimes flowering in snowbeds and rocky scree. The flowers actually track the movement of the sun throughout the day, an action called heliotropism ( US Dept of Agriculture Forest Service  - Click here for pictures and more information).

Mountain Avens - Our pleasantly light lemon truffle’s namesake is a whimsical yet hardy little white or yellow flower that thrives in the arctic tundra, sometimes flowering in snowbeds and rocky scree. The flowers actually track the movement of the sun throughout the day, an action called heliotropism (US Dept of Agriculture Forest Service - Click here for pictures and more information).

  Angler’s Breakfast  - Many Americans wake up everyday and begin their day with a cup of coffee. In Alaska, coffee shacks litter roadways almost as much as the moose do and at one point had more coffee shops per number of people than Seattle! Our little town of Homer is a fisherman’s town and fisherman are referred to as anglers. It is only fitting that our kona coffee truffle is an homage to all those anglers starting their 3 a.m. mornings with a hot cup of coffee.

Angler’s Breakfast - Many Americans wake up everyday and begin their day with a cup of coffee. In Alaska, coffee shacks litter roadways almost as much as the moose do and at one point had more coffee shops per number of people than Seattle! Our little town of Homer is a fisherman’s town and fisherman are referred to as anglers. It is only fitting that our kona coffee truffle is an homage to all those anglers starting their 3 a.m. mornings with a hot cup of coffee.

  Qiviut  - Our deliciously smooth and creamy peanut butter truffle is dubbed the qiviut [kee-vee-uht]. Qiviut is an Inuit term describing the underhair on the bellies of muskox. The hair is extremely soft and brown in color. It is highly valued and rare since the muskox species was almost completely wiped out by the early 1900’s. A small population of muskox was returned to Alaska in 1930, allowing them to thrive and increase in number to over 4,000 today ( ADFG  - Click here for pictures and more information)

Qiviut - Our deliciously smooth and creamy peanut butter truffle is dubbed the qiviut [kee-vee-uht]. Qiviut is an Inuit term describing the underhair on the bellies of muskox. The hair is extremely soft and brown in color. It is highly valued and rare since the muskox species was almost completely wiped out by the early 1900’s. A small population of muskox was returned to Alaska in 1930, allowing them to thrive and increase in number to over 4,000 today (ADFG - Click here for pictures and more information)

  Midnight Sun  - With a candied golden orange nestled atop our blood orange truffle, it is reminiscent of summers in Alaska. There are areas of Alaska where the sun sits on the horizon at midnight at the Arctic Circle. All of Alaska, however, enjoys longer daylight hours in summer compared to our Lower 48 states ( Alaska Centers  - Click here for pictures and more information).

Midnight Sun - With a candied golden orange nestled atop our blood orange truffle, it is reminiscent of summers in Alaska. There are areas of Alaska where the sun sits on the horizon at midnight at the Arctic Circle. All of Alaska, however, enjoys longer daylight hours in summer compared to our Lower 48 states (Alaska Centers - Click here for pictures and more information).

  Permafrost  - The bite of dark chocolate and freshness of cool mint take you to the Alaskan tundra wilds. The crispness of our mint truffle reminds us of the rock solid frozen soil nestled underneath 85% of Alaska’s land surface called permafrost; even during the summer it does not thaw. It influences Alaska’s ecosystem providing water to the soil and keeping the ground cool, while creating extremely unique tundra land forms ( ADFG  - Click here for pictures and more information).

Permafrost - The bite of dark chocolate and freshness of cool mint take you to the Alaskan tundra wilds. The crispness of our mint truffle reminds us of the rock solid frozen soil nestled underneath 85% of Alaska’s land surface called permafrost; even during the summer it does not thaw. It influences Alaska’s ecosystem providing water to the soil and keeping the ground cool, while creating extremely unique tundra land forms (ADFG - Click here for pictures and more information).

  Summer Harvest  - Berry picking season is one of our family’s favorite! A memento to this season is our raspberry and creamy cocoa butter white chocolate truffle. The prime time for picking berries is in August, where the family gathers their berry pickers, hiking gear...and bear insurance. In Alaska, we have a wide variety of berries for the berry lover: blueberries, raspberries, cloudberries, lingonberries, crowberries, strawberries, high-bush cranberries, and salmonberries, to name a few ( Alaska.org  - Click here for pictures and more information).  

Summer Harvest - Berry picking season is one of our family’s favorite! A memento to this season is our raspberry and creamy cocoa butter white chocolate truffle. The prime time for picking berries is in August, where the family gathers their berry pickers, hiking gear...and bear insurance. In Alaska, we have a wide variety of berries for the berry lover: blueberries, raspberries, cloudberries, lingonberries, crowberries, strawberries, high-bush cranberries, and salmonberries, to name a few (Alaska.org - Click here for pictures and more information).  

We hope you are able to try our HTC Truffle Collection and enjoy them while learning a little bit of their Alaskan namesakes. We are proud to live in such a unique area and share it in such a unique way. Visit all the links provided to learn even more about our great State of Alaska. May you all have a blessed day!